Windows Movie Maker…here all along

Name: Windows Movie Maker (2010)
Cost: Free (only for Windows users)
Type: Software
Rating: 2/5

Movie Maker logo

This may be news to some Windows users, but you have access to video editing software already loaded on your computer, as long as you have Windows 10, 8, or 7. Movie Maker is not really well advertised, as compared to iMovie (which is the free software on Macs), but that might be because Movie Maker is not as comprehensive and professional looking as iMovie. Nonetheless, when looking for a video editing tool, why not rely on the one that’s already on your PC? I am always anxious about downloading new software, so it’s great that my operating system actually provides useful software for “free” (if you define “free” as, “rolled into the costs of the operating system”). I had started using Movie Maker over 10 years ago, but then promptly stopped once I got access to Camtasia. Movie Maker is easy to use, which made it a good introduction to the concepts and skills needed to piece together short video clips that have photos, screen captures or other video files, and audio clips. It has the MS Office feel with the menu tabs and options, so it may not feel foreign to users already relying on PowerPoint for visual creations.

Goal: Rely on a free, easy to use video editing tool to create short videos (mostly graphics and text)

Benefits:

  • Drag and drop ability for adding media to the timeline.
  • Very simple looking workspace. Sometimes a long timeline along the bottom of the workspace can be intimidating to new users, so Movie Maker has more of a graphic approach that downplays the look of a timeline.

    Movie Maker workspace

    As you can see, this is a pretty simple workspace, with a drag and drop option to add movie clips, audio, or graphics.

  • There are some tutorials and guides available on the Microsoft site so that you don’t have to rely on YouTube and other non-Microsoft support sites.
  • As mentioned above, it has a similar look and functionality as Word or PowerPoint, so there isn’t much to learn about navigating the software.
  • The transitions options are interesting, especially when adding some overlays (e.g., sparkling lights around the corners). These might work well if you’re creating a photo montage for an anniversary party or wedding reception, where dozens of photos are projected on a screen in video format.
  • There is the ability to type (or paste) in captions. So, if you have a transcript, you can add it to the video. The trick, though, is timing the captions with the audio so the audience is hearing the content when it appears on screen.

    Movie Maker transition options

    This is the menu bar with the most “feature” options for the software. It is a variety of transitions and slide animations you can apply to each graphic or video clip.

Movie Maker timing tools

I spend the most time with these tools when working on editing a video based on PowerPoint slides and audio narration. I have to adjust the timing so the audience has enough time to read the graphic and/or hear the audio narration before transitioning to the next graphic/video clip.

Drawbacks:

  • Syncing up audio and video can be a little tedious, though this is true for most video editors. One change in transitions or video clips and the audio syncing needs to be redone (the extent of the revising depends on how close to the start of the video the change was made). Students who have used the software have reported similar frustrations with adding audio. I try to add audio only after I’m pretty sure the video is what I want it to be.
  • Although this is true for most video editors (except for Camtasia), video clips created with Jing cannot be added/edited to Movie Maker for further editing or combination with other file types. So, if I want to add a screen capture video to my video, then I need to . Microsoft Support provides a list of accepted files, which is extensive, but .swf for a Jing video is not on the list. To get a Jing video in the right file format, I have to use Camtasia to save it as an MP4. Do not despair, though. My favorite screen capture tool create MP4 files: Screencast-O-Matic.

    Movie Maker error message

    This is the error I got when trying to add an MP4 file I downloaded from Pixabay. The “help” links didn’t provide further insights. So, if I want to use these movie clips in future videos, I’ll have to go with different software.

  • The video is saved as .wmv, so the audience needs the Windows or you need to upload it to a site like YouTube. Mac users won’t have access to Windows Media Player, which will play the .wmv file. So, if you just want to email the file or share it (e.g., Google Drive or Dropbox), then Mac users will need to download a comparable media player (e.g., Free WMV Player, which I haven’t tried so use at your own risk).
  • I like to add background video clips from Pixabay, where there might be a train going by or an abstract figure in motion, and then overlay text to emphasize any points made in the audio narration. Unfortunately, every time I tried to add the MP4 file from Pixabay, it came back with an error. When I tried to use the help function, it wasn’t very helpful beyond explaining that the file was not compatible with Movie Maker even though it’s in MP4 format. I’m not sure if this is a user error or software limitation, but since I’ve used the Pixabay files in other video editing tools, I’m guessing it’s a software limitation.

Insider View:I primarily use this software to convert my PowerPoint slides into movies with audio narration. While this can be done with PowerPoint (see my tutorial post), that file might be too large or in a format that can’t be easily uploaded to YouTube. I also like Movie Maker because I can add other movie clips (of certain formats) to the video, so that I can move from a slide to a video clip and back to the slides. I use Audacity for creating the audio clip files.

Final Thoughts: I recently found out that my parents use this software. They are fine with admitting they’re a good test for “ease of use” when they can use software without calling me. Just for that fact, I’d give the software a rating of 5/5. But, it does lack some features, has quirky limitations, and is a little difficult to use when syncing audio, so I have to hold it to a little higher standard than my parents’ usability testing. Even so, I think novices could figure out the basics for video editing and adding effects. Although the software does not get high praise from other users, it’s still a useful, free option for combining graphics with audio.

Link: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14220/windows-movie-maker-download

Samples: I’ve provided only one sample here, as there aren’t many features that can be shown to differentiate Movie Maker from other video editors I’ve reviewed. Before watching the video, you should know that it isn’t something I’d share with my students. Rather, it shows some of the available transitions, which is the major feature of Movie Maker. Typically, I’d choose one transition type throughout. The video is simple, in that I used PowerPoint slides as the basis and downloaded royalty-free background music.

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