Random Tip #11: GCFLearnFree.org

YouTube…the chaotic bazaar of videos, where you can find quality and awful within a few clicks of each other. It really reminds me of the local video rental place we went to when I was young (…I know, I’m totally dating myself). It was a small shop, with poor lighting and shelves running all along the walls (with a set of shorter shelves running through the middle of the store). While the videos were somewhat organized by genre, with one step you could move from Labyrinth to Goonies to The Garbage Pail Kids Movie.

So, my point is, as an instructor, I don’t want to send my students to the sometimes unenlightening world of YouTube if I can avoid it by providing more specific recommendations. This is especially true when I ask students to use PowerPoint or Prezi to make their messages more dynamic. While many students now have been creating PowerPoint since they were in kindergarten, those without early experiences are panic stricken with the thought of clicking on the PowerPoint icon and facing a blank slide. Telling these students just to search YouTube for a PowerPoint tutorial might push them completely into technophobia. Lynda.com is also an option, but not everyone has access to the full video content, which can be frustrating if you get through the introduction and still need more information.

I recently came across a reliable and useful website that provides access to 125 free tutorials about technology (and other topics, such as Reading, Math, and career advancement). It’s the Goodwill Community Foundation: www.gcflearnfree.org. I’ve listed some of my favorite resources, but it’s worth sending students to browse the whole website to see what other useful tutorials and insights they can find. GCF Logo

My favorites include:

Most of the videos are short so that you can just review one video per topic, versus a long video with a variety of topics that you have to watch or fast-forward through. Not all the tutorials have videos, which is helpful for those who need to move through the content more slowly than what a short video can accommodate. I also like that there are share buttons (e.g., Facebook, Google +) buttons, along with a button to print or a button for a “single page view” (if the article is extensive). The content is professional, without being intimidating, and access is free.

GCF tutorial list sample

This is what a list of related tutorials looks like on the website. Clicking on a blue square will reveal the tutorial. Some tutorials provide further suggested links at the end of the article.

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